Italian family certificate

What is an Italian Family Certificate?

When dealing with inheritance matters in Italy, you may be requested by the Italian authorities to produce a document called Certificato di stato di Famiglia (Family Certificate).

This document is extracted from official public registers held at Italian Councils (Comune) certifying your family relationship with the deceased or other family members. It contains information regarding members of a family and states the personal details of all the people living in each family specifying family, marriage, affinity or adoption relationships.

However, while it is simple enough to obtain a family certificate as an Italian resident, by submitting an application to the Council (Comune) of last residence of the deceased, it can be problematic if the deceased or his family are not habitually resident in Italy.

Instead, if the deceased and/or the beneficiaries, are resident in a jurisdiction which does not have the equivalent document of a certificato di stato di famiglia it is possible to apply for autodichiarazione (self-declaration). This is a declaration which any person can provide regarding his/her personal and family status.

The signature of an autocertificazione does not necessarily have to signed in front of any particular professional and does not require any certification or authentication by any professional of organisation. It is advisable however to seek guidance from an Italian lawyer who has experience in dealing with Italian inheritance matters for non-Italian residents with regard to this as well as the other aspects of inheriting assets from Italy.

If you need assistance with obtaining a certificato di stato di familia or autodichiarazione or with any aspects of dealing with an inheritance in ItalyWorldwide Lawyers can put you in touch with an Italian lawyer who specialises in Italian inheritance. Contact our friendly team on 01244 470 339 or info@worldwidelawyers.co.uk

Author: Sara Janion, overseas legal expert, solicitor and Notary Public

 

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