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Getting Married In Italy

Planning a wedding in Italy? – Congratulations!

If you are a British citizen and are getting married in Italy, not only will you need to plan the venue, flowers and food- you will need to know what legal documents are required in order for you to get legally married in Italy too!

Getting organized with the legal side early is essential so you can enjoy planning the rest of your special day and make sure it goes without a hitch!

We have therefore provided some information below about the basic legal requirements for British citizens, resident in the UK who are planning to get married in Italy.

 

Can we get legally married in Italy?

If you are a British couple, it is possible for you to get legally married in Italy as long as certain requirements are completed.

If only one of the couple is a British Citizen, the person who is from the other country (eg USA, India etc) you must also fulfill the paperwork requirements with his/her country. This is not covered in this article.

 

What do we need to get legally married in Italy?

If you are British couple and resident in the UK, you will need to take the following steps before your Italian wedding in order to make sure your marriage in Italy is legally recognised:

 

Step 1. Obtain a Certificate of No Impediment

You will need to obtain a Certificate of No Impediment. This is sometimes referred to an CNI or CoNI and known in Italy as “Nulla Osta”.

In order to obtain a Certificate of No Impediment you must first both give notice at your local registry office in the UK of your intention to get married.

After the notice has been posted for the required period of time (usually between 16-21 days) and assuming no one has objected to the marriage!, the Certificate of No Impediment is issued by your local registrar in the UK who will sign and date the document.

The Certificate of no Impediment certificate is valid for 6 months, so the wedding must be celebrated within 6 months (3 months for Scotland).

Your full names must be stated on the Certificate of No Impediment and these names must be identical to the names in your passports.

If one or both of the couple are divorced, widowed, or were previously in civil partnership you will need the appropriate documents (e.g. the decree absolute, death certificate or civil partnership dissolution or annulment) in order to obtain the Certificate of No Impediment UK.

 

Step 2. Obtain a Statutory Declaration and sign in front of a solicitor/notary

Both of you will need to make a Statutory Declaration (a legal written statement of fact which is signed in front of a solicitor or notary public).

The Statutory Declaration includes your basic details such as your name, address, nationality and current marital status.

You can download a bi-lingual (Italian and English) template of the required Statutory Declaration here.

You will need to arrange to go to a solicitor or notary public in the UK so that you can sign the Statutory Declaration in front of them. Therefore you must not sign the form before the meeting. The solicitor or notary will also sign this document.

The solicitor or public notary will charge a small fee for this service. You should check what the fee will be before the meeting as fees may vary. The fee may also be required to be paid in cash. You should also take your passport to this meeting.

 

Step 3. Legalise the documents for use in Italy.

Once you have obtained both the Certificate of No Impediment and the signed Statutory Declaration they must both be “legalised’ for use abroad.

This means that the documents will need to be sent to the Foreign and Commonwealth office in the UK for them to stamp the documents with the Hague Apostille so they can be recognised in Italy.

The notary or solicitor who signed the Statutory Declaration may be able arrange this for you for a small fee.

 

Step 4. Arrange for Translation of the Certificate of No Impediment in Italy

Once both the Certificate of No Impediment and the Statutory Declaration have been legalised, you will then need to have the legalised Certificate of No Impediment officially translated. (The Statutory Declaration does not need to be translated since it is already in both languages.)

As it will become an official Italian legal document, the Certificate of no impediment has to be translated into Italian by an official Italian translator in Italy. It then must be legalised in Italy by an Italian authority. This may be at a local court in Italy or Judge of Peace (traduzione asseverata).

If you need assistance finding an official Italian translator, contact Worldwide Lawyers on 01244 470339 or at info@worldwidelawyers.co.uk. We can put you in touch with a recommended Italian translator based in Italy who will carry out this service for you and will arrange for the document to be translated and legalised in an Italian Court ready for your Italian wedding.

 

Step 5. Send the documents to the Town Hall of where the wedding will take place

After all of the above steps have been undertaken you will usually need to send both the Certificate of No Impediment and the Statutory Declaration to the Town Hall where the wedding will take place. You should send these by registered post or courier.

Depending on the local town hall it may not be necessary to send the original documents in advance (the CoNI and Statutory Declaration and any other required documents). It may be sufficient to send a scan and then take the originals there a few days before the wedding, you will need to check the requirements with the local town hall.

The Italian translator may be able to liaise with the town hall for you to let you know their specific requirements. If you need assistance finding an official Italian translator, contact Worldwide Lawyers on 01244 470339 or at info@worldwidelawyers.co.uk.

 

Step 6. Visit the Town Hall before your wedding in Italy with your passports and documentation

Before your wedding ceremony in Italy, you will both need to visit the Town Hall with your passports and documentation to get all your paperwork checked. You will also usually need to make a declaration (this substitutes the public posting of notice of marriage, which an Italian national would have to do).

You will need to check with the Town Hall how many days prior to your wedding this should be. You should also check if they need any additional documentation from you.

The Italian translator may be able to liaise with the town hall for you to let you know their specific requirements. If you need assistance finding an official Italian translator, contact Worldwide Lawyers on 01244 470339 or at info@worldwidelawyers.co.uk.

 

Is there anything else that I need to know before my wedding in Italy?

  • Both UK residents must have their Passport at the wedding.
  • Under Italian law, Women must wait 300 days after becoming widowed or divorced to re-marry. It may be possible to arrange for this requirement to be dispensed with by making a request to the local court in Italy. An Italian lawyer will be able to assist you with this. If you need assistance finding an official Italian Lawyer, contact Worldwide Lawyers on 01244 470339 or at info@worldwidelawyers.co.uk.
  • At the wedding ceremony you will need 2 witnesses, who will sign as witnesses of the ceremony.
  • If you are paying for your wedding in Euros it is recommend that you use a currency specialist to make the payments rather than making the transfer of the money through a bank. The reason that this is recommended is because currency specialists can typically save around 3-4% on the exchange rate when compared with high street banks. For example if the costs of your Italian wedding are the equivalent of £10,000 which is required to be paid in euros, a currency specialist could save you around £300-£400 on the costs of the wedding by offering a more competitive currency exchange rate than your bank.

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